Child Bride

“Do you kiss your mother with that mouth?” It’s a cruel joke. He knows I haven’t seen my mother in over a decade. I’ve forgotten her face, how her lips kissed away nightmares.

“I’ve been at the school.” He sits the open duffle bag on the counter, and I know there’s a girl in the trunk.

I fear I’ve grown too old. I don’t see my face on the news anymore. Amazing technology — how they added twelve years to my nine-year-old picture, and it looks exactly like me.

Maybe he won’t kill me. Maybe I’ll see my mother again. Maybe the new girl will find home again too — one day, when she’s no longer a child.

—Nortina


moral_mondays_logoJoin Moral Mondays, a new weekly challenge to write a 100-word fable or story based on the moral/lesson provided in the prompt. This past week’s moral: better late than never

Practice Is Over

“It’s alright.” Coach Conway strokes my collarbone with his thumb. I don’t like it when he touches me. His hands aren’t rough like a man’s hands—like the calluses I pick from Daddy’s palms when he comes home late from the mill and falls asleep on the couch.

“I’m sure she has a good excuse.”

There’s no good excuse for why Ma forced me to play soccer when I told her I liked basketball, for why she’s left me alone with this man who makes my skin crawl two hours after practice has ended.

“Basketball’s for butch lesbians,” she said. Better them than a man whose lips are always moist when he speaks to me, who cups his crotch whenever he sits next to me on the bench to talk about the accuracy in my kicks.

“How bout I take you to get something to eat,” he says, but this is the middle of nowhere—our town just got a Subway last month, and that’s closer to my house.

“No, I’m fine,” I say, and I try not to flinch when he suddenly squats between my legs and slaps his clammy hands down on my thighs.

word count: 196

—Nortina


ffpp_11Flash Fiction for the Purposeful Practitioner is a weekly challenge for writers to create a story in under 200 words using the provided photo prompt and introductory sentence as their ‘muse.’ Click the froggy icon to read other stories inspired by the photo and add your own.