Monday’s One-Minute Fiction: Week of February 19

Rise and shine! May I borrow a minute of your morning for a quick flash fiction challenge? How quickly does an idea spark and develop into a story when you only have a picture, a word, or a phrase…and one minute to write?

Monday’s One-Minute Fiction challenges you to write a complete micro-fiction piece in, you guessed it, one minute, no more, no less, based on the prompt provided! Of course, you can come back to edit for grammar & spelling, but the story itself must be written in a minute.

Hello, February! Ah, so many great things happen in February—the Super Bowl, the Winter Olympics, Black History Month, Black Poetry Writing Month…

I’ve been inspired by my Black Poetry Writing Month challenge to give you some BlaPoWriMo-themed prompts for #1MinFiction. Are you ready? Let’s get started.

This week’s BlaPoWriMo theme is the Black Arts Movement, which was definitely an era of defiance and…

protest

That’s your one-word prompt! Now it’s time for the rules. I don’t have many, because we all know rules are no fun, but here are the basic logistics for each challenge:

  • Write your story in one minute. (Use a stop watch to keep yourself honest. 😉 )
  • Post it to your blog and tag it #1MinFiction.
  • Link it back to this prompt post.

If you’d like to join BlaPoWriMo, click here for challenge details.

I’m partnering with Marquessa at The Next Chapter to bring you #1MinFiction and her challenge, #LyricalFictionFriday. Be sure to stop by her blog this Friday for more fun prompts (and to build an awesome playlist too! 😉 )

Now, let’s get writing, shall we? And…

Ready . . .

Set . . .

Write!

Monday’s One-Minute Fiction: Week of February 12

Rise and shine! May I borrow a minute of your morning for a quick flash fiction challenge? How quickly does an idea spark and develop into a story when you only have a picture, a word, or a phrase…and one minute to write?

Monday’s One-Minute Fiction challenges you to write a complete micro-fiction piece in, you guessed it, one minute, no more, no less, based on the prompt provided! Of course, you can come back to edit for grammar & spelling, but the story itself must be written in a minute.

Hello, February! Ah, so many great things happen in February—the Super Bowl, the Winter Olympics, Black History Month, Black Poetry Writing Month…

I’ve been inspired by my Black Poetry Writing Month challenge to give you some BlaPoWriMo-themed prompts for #1MinFiction. Are you ready? Let’s get started.

This week’s BlaPoWriMo theme is the Harlem Renaissance, a time when blacks exploded onto the scene with great literature, art, and music, including jazz. One the main characteristics of jazz music inspired this poem, and it also inspired your prompt for the week…

improv

*Technically speaking, #1MinFiction is already a form of improvisation, so this shouldn’t be hard right?…

Now it’s time for the rules. I don’t have many, because we all know rules are no fun, but here are the basic logistics for each challenge:

  • Write your story in one minute. (Use a stop watch to keep yourself honest. 😉 )
  • Post it to your blog and tag it #1MinFiction.
  • Link it back to this prompt post.

If you’d like to join BlaPoWriMo, click here for challenge details.

I’m partnering with Marquessa at The Next Chapter to bring you #1MinFiction and her challenge, #LyricalFictionFriday. Be sure to stop by her blog this Friday for more fun prompts (and to build an awesome playlist too! 😉 )

Now, let’s get writing, shall we? And…

Ready . . .

Set . . .

Write!

*mammy – a black woman who worked as a nanny/housekeeper for a white family, often nursing the family’s children

#BlaPoWriMo: Thoughts While Listening to X

Tonya wears jeans three days of the week
when only Fridays are reserved for casual
dress, but who’s checking when half the
office works remote; the rest leave before
five, and I stay behind stretched between
miscellaneous requests and thoughts that
I might have worn the same sweater twice
in one week or that my boots squeak when
I walk to the bathroom as the torn hem to
the only business pants I own that don’t
fit me like slacks drags across the carpet.
In front of the mirror, I stand against the
backdrop of four stalls and pick out my
afro that shrank three inches in the dank
atmosphere below the heating & air vent,
and return to my desk, earbuds plugged,
to fill the silence with the soundtracks of
Black Panther and hope the bald white
man in the corner office who frightens
me like a skinhead with a noose doesn’t
hear Kendrick encourage me too loudly,
Fuck the place up.

—Nortina


Poem inspired by the improvisational characteristics of jazz music and the Black Panther soundtrack that just came out today.

Written for Black Poetry Writing Month (BlaPoWriMo). This year, we’re taking a journey through the different eras of black poetry and history. This week’s era is: Harlem Renaissance

Black Poetry Writing Month: Write a Poem Inspired by Music

Battle Report

One thousand saxophones infiltrate the city.
Each with a man inside,
Hidden in ordinary cases,
Labeled FRAGILE.

A fleet of trumpets drops their hooks,
Inside at the outside.

Ten waves of trombones approach the city
Under blue cover
Of late autumn’s neo-classical clouds.

Five hundred bassmen, all string feet tall,
Beating it back to the bass.

One hundred drummers, each a stick in each hand,
The delicate rumble of pianos, moving in.

The secret agent, an innocent bystander,
Drops a note in the wail box.

Five generals, gathered in the gallery,
Blowing plans.

At last, the secret code is flashed:
Now is the time, now is the time.

Attack: The sound of jazz.

The city falls.

—Bob Kaufman, from Solitudes Crowded with Loneliness (1965)

 

Jazz music is all about improvisation. A band that consists of maybe a saxophonist, a trumpet and trombone player, a bassist, a drummer, a pianist, and lastly, a singer could have an original musical arrangement—either written or learned by ear and memorized—but once it’s time for each musician to perform his or her two minute solo, everything changes. Each performer spins their own little twist to the melody, showing off their musical talents. From the drummer to the saxophonist. Even the singer may do a little bebop. There may even be a call-and-response exchange between the singer and other musicians, a competition of who’s improvisation is the best, until finally they all come back together to close the number, and the audience erupts in applause. Bob Kaufman’s “Battle Report” serves as a metaphor to that element of jazz.

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For today’s BlaPoWriMo prompt, write a poem inspired by a genre of music. It could be jazz, hip hop, country, whatever music you prefer. Incorporate the characteristics of that music genre into your writing—the sound, the rhythm, the style. Make us feel the music in your words.

—Nortina